New User Manual

Hey everyone

We value feedback from you and try to implement changes as much as possible. One feedback we got was that our instructions for the top feeder was not too clear. So we have been editing our manual to make everything look prettier and more clear. Below you can see the new manual.

If you have any questions or any feedback, just send us an email, or write on our Facebook page.

Happy beekeeping!

ApiMaye_Updated_Manual

How does the pollen trap work?

How does the pollen trap work?

All Apimaye screened bottom boards come equipped with a pollen trap and a drawer.

When the pollen trap is taken out entirely, the bottom board functions as a full screen bottom board. The bees get in through the hive entrance and go up to the frames.

When the pollen flow is very high, you can insert the pollen trap from the back slot into the hive. The bees will enter the hive through the hive entrance but this time they will walk forward inside this wide hallway we just created. The only way to access the frames is through the round holes that are only big enough for the bees to pass through. The pollen will not fit and will fall to the pollen tray at the bottom. Our trap is very effective and will fill its tray at the bottom rather soon. It is suggested to check the tray often and not use the pollen trap for extended period of time.

When not not using the pollen trap, pull it out completely if possible, and insert the red plug to the slot. If taking the trap completely off is not an option, try to slide it out as much as possible. There will always be some bees who will walk towards the back of the hive to go up. If the trap is in,  they will be going through the trap which will cause unintentional pollen collection. If you don’t check your tray, it will go bad in the tray and wasted.

 

Got something to add about the pollen trap? Make a comment below. Also check out our Knowledge Base page to see what others have asked. Ask away using the form

Bees are social, and now so are we!

Bees are social, and now so are we!

It took us much longer than we had planned but we now finally have an official Facebook page! This year is our first spring season, and we wanted to make sure our existing operations can be scaled fluently before we add even more tasks to the the to-do list. What is it that we were doing you may ask. Here’s what we’ve been doing:

  • Received a new container of goods in early March. We unloaded them and inspected every hive
  • Negotiated with both UPS and Fedex and got better rates and passed the savings to our customers
  • Integrated a shipping platform – Shippo (A friend’s company here in San Francisco) to our website so we can offer shipping notification with tracking number
  • Implemented a secure credit card payment terminal Stripe so we can now accept credit card payments without PayPal
  • Updated our manuals to include more clear and detailed information
  • Purchased color printers so we can print our manuals in color 🙂
  • Shipped lots and lots of products to our new and repeat customers, as well as Amazon warehouses!
  • Worked on social sharing of our website so you can share any page, post or product you like with your friends

Speaking of social sharing, and going back to the topic, we were motivated by one of our dear customers. She told us multiple times that we should have a Facebook page where we can introduce our products and answer question, and create a platform where people can easily ask questions and share their hives, stories, and opinions. It is now possible with our new Facebook page. Every time somebody asks a question there, whether it’s a beekeeping question or a product question, we’ll create a blog post about it and add it to our knowledge base. Knowledge is the only thing that you have less as you share, so we are here to share our and your knowledge.

So, what’s next?

We recorded some videos of me explaining our products and some procedures. They are very amateur looking and needs lots of work on editing (and in my opinion, completely redone). We’ll start posting videos on our YouTube channel too.

Bees are social, and now so are we!

Korhan

How can I use my wooden boxes with Ergo Hive Kits?

How Can I Use My Wooden Boxes with Ergo Hive Kits?

Apimaye has 2 series of bee hives, the Defender series and the Ergo series. In the US we have the Ergo series because it’s the only one compatible with the US Langstroth size. This way the beekeepers can use their wooden frames and our plastic handy frames interchangeably. They are also compatible with the wooden bee boxes.

Our bee hives come with 2 deep boxes. If you want to add your wooden supers, you just put them right on top. If you’d like to add another of Apimaye supers, that’s also no problem. The wooden boxes sit right in the grooves of our supers so our supers do not slide or fall, and there is no gap between the boxes. You can add our top feeder and our top cover on top on top of your wooden box.

How to Apply Oxialic Acid Vaporizer on Apimaye Bee Hives

How to Apply Oxialic Acid Vaporizer on Apimaye Bee Hives

Varroa mite treatment is crucial for a healthy bee colony. One way of treating Varroa mites in a bee hive is using Oxialic Acid Vaporizer. There are 2 methods of applying the vaporizer on our bee hives. The difference is in first method, one has apply from under the hive, and use a little bit more than usual, and in the second method, one has to modify the vaporizer and take the front entrance reducer.

The First Method

Let’s start with the easy method. You’ll need

  • Oxialic acid
  • Acid vaporizer
  • Power source for your vaporizer
  • 1 large, or 2 regular sized damp towels

For the application please follow these steps:

  • Take the pollen trap off the hive and seal the slot with the red plug
  • Take the pollen and bottom board tray out
  • Shut the entrance reducer and front circular outlets close
  • Put oxialic acid in the vaporizer and slide it under the hive from the back
  • Seal the perimeter of the bottom board with the damp towel(s)
  • Connect the vaporizer to the power source
  • Let it sit about 5 to 10 minutes until all the acid granules have vaporized
  • Unplug the vaporizer from the power source
  • Take the towels out
  • Open the hive entrance and the round circular outlets back
  • Put the pollen and bottom drawer back
  • Put the pollen trap back if using

The drawback of this easy method is that you’ll need a little bit more oxialic acid than usual. This is our suggested method due to the easiness of the procedure.

The Second Method

This method is slightly more difficult as it requires modification on the vaporizer.

For this method you’ll need

  • Oxialic acid
  • Acid vaporizer
  • Power source for your vaporizer
  • 1 regular sized damp towel
  • Philips screwdriver
  • Hive tool/flat screwdriver
  • Paint stick from a hardware store
  • Wire

You can already see that this method is a little more demanding. We will be putting the vaporizer from the front of the bee hive by taking the front entrance reducer. Since the vaporizer will be heating up, it should not be laying on top of the plastic bottom board.

Vaporizer Modification

  • Obtain a paint stick from the paint department of a hardware store
  • Place the vaporizer on top of the paint stick
  • Tie the vaporizer from multiple locations to the paint stick with the wire (it is better if you drill holes on the stick for the wires go through, or you may secure it using other methods as well)
  • Make sure the vaporizer is secured to the paint stick

Application

  • Unscrew the two screws that are holding the entrance reducer in its place using the Philips screwdriver
  • Use the hive tool or a flat screwdriver to pull the entrance reducer up and take it off
  • Put oxialic acid to the modified vaporizer
  • Slide the modified vaporizer inside the hive from the front
  • Seal the front hive opening with the damp towel
  • Close the round entrance pieces
  • Connect the vaporizer to the power source
  • Let it sit about 5 to 10 minutes until all the acid granules have vaporized
  • Unplug the vaporizer from the power source
  • Take the damp towel out
  • Remove the vaporizer from the hive
  • Screw the entrance reducer back to its slot
  • Open the circular hive entrance back

You may choose to use this method over the other, and it’s totally up to you.

You can see that it’s not that hard to apply it at all.

 

Choosing a wax foundation for our handy frames

Our plastic handy frames are really easy to operate and great for comb honey. They are not designed to operate with Rite-cell plastic foundation because those foundations are too thick. Our frames can not snap back fully with plastic foundation in between.

When choosing wax foundation, make sure you get deep size (~8 1/2″ x 16 3/4″). They can be wired or not as it doesn’t make any difference. Also remember Rite-cell with wax coating is not wax foundation.

Where to find them

You can buy your wax foundation from your local beekeeping supply store (we always encourage supporting local small businesses like us) but in case that is not an option, here are a few links to some online stores:

Dadant – wired 10 sheets DEEP SIZE

New Worker Bee in Hive

We have a new worker bee

We are happy to announce that we got our hive not only filled with new goodies but also a new worker bee. Burcu, my sister has recently joined us back in Arizona while writing her thesis. She’ll be the 3rd doctor, only non engineer/scientist in the family. She’ll be helping us all in her spare time. We are planning on growing with her support, and have a more fun work environment thanks to her never ending playlist.

Speaking of growing, and filling our hive with new goodies, our shipment has finally arrived after the customs inspection. We unloaded everything of to our warehouse in Mesa. We give our big thanks to Matt, Murat, Turan, my dad and Burcu as it would not have been that easy (not that it was easy) without their help. Burcu and I opened and inspected every hive package to make sure everything is up to our standards.

There are more than 30 boxes labeled ready to go on Monday & Tuesday. We have a jar of honey ready for our UPS and FedEx drivers so that they don’t hate us :). These are large and heavy boxes after all; and we want to make sure people are happy to work with us.

We’ve done a lot of work this weekend, and there is a lot more to do. Thanks for your support, we are happy to be growing with you.

Korhan from Apimaye USA

 

PS: And here are a few pictures (shes’s responsible for most of the poses :D)

Full container

You should have seen the looks on people’s faces when we opened the gates

High five inside container

Sitting at the last 2 boxes in the entire container. It was worth high fiving

showing off after unloading the container

Totally rocking the maroon and gold 🙂

 

Our new shipment has landed in Long Beach

We are excited to announce that our second shipment of bee hives have just arrived to Long Beach port this afternoon after their month long voyage from Istanbul, Turkey. They’ll go through customs and will be brought to our new warehouse in Mesa, Arizona. We’ll then open every box, inspect and repack them for resale.

In our first holiday season we were overwhelmed by the demand and ran out of some of our inventory much faster than we had planned. We’ll make sure it will not happen again 🙂

Spring is here, happy beekeeping!

Korhan from Apimaye USA

 

We're rebuilding our hive

We’re working on making our site not only better looking, but also more informative. Our site will be down for the night, and the online shopping features may not be available till weekend.

In the meantime you can still reach us at 480-648-8385 or our email info@apimaye-usa.com or shop our products on Amazon.

Hope to be back up soon 🙂

 

Korhan – the worker bee from Apimaye USA

We’re rebuilding our hive

We’re working on making our site not only better looking, but also more informative. Our site will be down for the night, and the online shopping features may not be available till weekend.

In the meantime you can still reach us at 480-648-8385 or our email info@apimaye-usa.com or shop our products on Amazon.

Hope to be back up soon ?

 

Korhan – the worker bee from Apimaye USA